All Things Financial Planning Blog

We’re Married. Now What?

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With six wedding ceremonies to attend this year, 2012 has been the year of marriage celebrations for me. It’s an exciting time in many of my friend’s lives and I couldn’t be happier for them! However, as the months after the ceremony roll on, questions have been popping up as to the best way to merge finances, what debt to pay down first, what steps to take to change names, and what else is out there that they haven’t even considered. In hopes of assisting my friends along with the many other newlywed couples out there, below are some items to consider in the days and weeks after your marriage:

Name Change: Post wedding, make sure you obtain at least 3 copies of your official marriage certificate from the county clerk, which is where your name change will be indicated. You’ll begin the name change process by first obtaining a new social security card (visit http://www.socialsecurity.gov for more information). From there, visit the DMV to update your driver’s license and then move on to your passport, employer, voter registration, bills, bank accounts, etc. It may be helpful to make a list of all the accounts you’ll need to update.

Taxes: You and your spouse may begin to file your taxes as “Married Filing Jointly” in the year that you are married. Be sure to check in with your accountant as to if that is the best route for you two and update your withholding elections through your Human Resources department if appropriate.

Money Mergers: Hopefully you and your spouse had more than just one conversation about money pre-nuptials. Some things to consider in the days ahead are whether or not to open a joint account. If you decide to go this route, also discuss if you will maintain separate accounts or if everything going forward will be deposited into your joint account. Work out a detailed spending and savings plan and ensure the two of you are on the same page with how your money is being managed and spent.

Assets & Liabilities: Create a list of all of your accounts, including Roth IRAs, 401(k)s, checking, savings, and any other personal cash or investment accounts. Decide if any accounts (aside from retirement) should be consolidated and if you’d like to add each other to titles of cars, property, or any other assets. In addition, review your investments and take some time to adjust your allocations so that it is appropriate based on your combined goals. Also create a list of any outstanding debts such as: credit cards, student loans, mortgages, and car loans. Prioritize your debt re-payment plan by focusing on those balances with the highest interest rates first – likely your credit cards.

Insurance Needs: For items like car and health insurance, evaluate each of your plans and pick the better of the two. Your car insurance should provide the best coverage for the most reasonable price. For health insurance, ensure that your current doctors are available under your spouse’s plan or that you’re okay with making a change if necessary. With life insurance, first determine the amount of coverage needed by considering outstanding debt and the loss of household income that would occur should something happen to either you or your spouse. For young couples just starting out, look into term coverage, which should provide coverage at the most reasonable rate.

Beneficiary Update: An item that is commonly overlooked by newlyweds is the updating of beneficiary information. If you and your spouse determine that you’d like to name each other as beneficiaries, be sure to contact your HR department at work and any companies that hold a life insurance policy or retirement account for you to make necessary updates.

Estate Planning: In the months ahead, consider establishing Durable Power of Attorneys for finances and health care and creating a Will that addresses your combined assets and wishes.

The list above won’t address all of your financial concerns as newlyweds, but by taking the time to go through each item together and consulting your accountant, financial planner, or attorney, you will start your new marriage on a financially healthy road to success.

Mary Beth Storjohann, CFP®, CDFA
Senior Financial Planner
HoyleCohen
San Diego, CA

Author: Mary Beth Storjohann, CFP®, CDFA

Mary Beth Storjohann is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ (CFP®) professional and Certified Divorce Financial Analyst (CDFA). She holds her Bachelor of Science Degree in Finance with an emphasis in Financial Services from San Diego State University and is currently pursing a Master of Science in Financial Planning from the College for Financial Planning in Colorado. Mary Beth’s mission is to deliver comprehensive financial solutions that help families and individuals realize their lifelong aspirations. Mary Beth’s experience as a CFP® professional provides an essential layer of depth in understanding the myriad of complex issues that clients face. Mary Beth is an active member of the San Diego Financial Planning Association, NexGen Community, and is leading the San Diego FPA’s Wounded Warrior Project which pairs Financial Planners with Wounded Warriors for pro bono financial counseling.

3 thoughts on “We’re Married. Now What?

  1. Reblogged this on lessons . for . twenty . somethings . and commented:
    VERY interesting blog entry from Mary Beth Storjohann. My sister just got married about a month ago, and I have had lots of friends get married an engaged over the past couple of years. This is definitely a good one to share!

  2. I am very surprised that a name change is assumed to be part of this list. To be more inclusive, perhaps it should be listed as optional, and for both men and women. In Washington state, evidence of a marriage is required to change your name due to marriage, but a name change of the wife to the husband’s last name is not assumed.
    This form of name change is a social custom, and not a legal requirement, according to the Washington State Bar Association.

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