All Things Financial Planning Blog

How Do Options Work?

13 Comments


The Economics of FearWhat if you had had a hunch that Microsoft stock would skyrocket when it introduced Windows 8? Would you have risked purchasing Microsoft stock on just a hunch? Or what if you owned a hundred shares of Apple but wanted to protect yourself from the stock’s recent declines? Well you can do both through options. An option is a standardized contract to either buy or sell a stock at a pre-determined price within a specific date. The key word is option; if you buy an option contract, you have the option, not the obligation, to exercise your contract if it makes financial sense for you at that future date. Option trading has been around for thousands of years and is widely used by many people to either protect the value of an existing investment or speculate on the future movement of an asset. There are two types of option contracts: calls and puts. A call option gives the owner the option to buy a stock at a set price in the future, whereas a put option gives the owner the option to sell a stock at a set price in the future. Let’s see how each one works.

Example of a Put Option:

A put option grants you the right to sell a stock at a set price. An investor buys a put option if she feels the price of a stock is going to decline and wants to lock-in a particular price. Let’s look at a specific example: It is March, and you own 100 shares of Apple stock (symbol: AAPL) that you bought for $400. You think that the price of Apple will decline from its current price of $457 in the coming months and you want to protect your gains. Each option controls 100 shares of the underlying stock, so 1 put option would give you the protection you seek. You could buy a $450 put option that expires in 3 months (May). If the price of Apple goes below $450 between now and May, you can exercise your option and sell your shares at $450. If the price of Apple doesn’t get that low, then you would keep your shares and simply let your option expire.

Example of a Call Option:

A call option grants you the right to buy a stock at a specific price. You would buy a call option if you think the price of a stock will rise within a given time and you wanted to benefit from the expected rise. Continuing with our Apple example, assume you don’t own the stock, but you think that Apple stock will rise in the next couple of months. You could buy an option that expires in May that allows you to buy Apple stock at $500. If the price of Apple rises above $500, you could exercise your call option and buy the stock at $500. Again, if the price of Apple does not rise by the May expiration date, you simply let your option expire.

As you can imagine, options can be useful for certain investors who are interested in: protecting a large gain; benefiting from a stock’s rise/fall without actually owning the stock; and in some cases, diversifying. While there are only two types of options (calls and puts), there are a multitude of strategies an investor can employ by combining calls and puts.

Though it may seem that options as part of your portfolio is a no-brainer, this article is simply an introduction to options. It is important to understand that options are quite complicated and can be rather risky. Options should only be used by experienced investors who really understand the mechanics of options – note, there is no easy money in trading options. Some people brag about making a lot of money in options, but be careful because option prices move very quickly, and while you can quickly make a lot of money, you can also easily lose a lot of money in just a single day.

Ara OghoorianAra Oghoorian, CFP®, CFA
Founder and President
ACap Asset Management
Los Angeles, CA

Author: Ara Oghoorian, CFA, CFP®

Ara Oghoorian, CFA, CFP®, is the founder and president of ACap Asset Management, Inc., a boutique wealth management firm located in Los Angeles, CA. ACap provides comprehensive investment management and financial planning services with a niche in advising physicians and medical professionals. Ara began his professional career 20 years ago at Wells Fargo Bank in Huntington Beach, CA piloting new supermarket banks. He then moved to San Francisco to obtain a degree in finance and worked full time at the Federal Reserve Bank. Ara spent nearly nine years there as a bank examiner where he audited U.S. banks, bank holding companies, and foreign institutions from Japan, Hong Kong, China, Korea, Taiwan, Philippines, United Kingdom and France. In 2005, Ara accepted a prestigious position with the US Department of the Treasury as the resident advisor to the Ministry of Finance and Economy in the Republic of Armenia. He was responsible for advising the top officials of the Republic of Armenia on how to transition from a centralized audit function to a decentralized system. Upon his return to the US, Ara worked for a wealth management firm in the Washington DC area advising and managing the personal wealth of CEOs from Fortune 500 companies. Ara has spent his entire career in finance and as a result, he has a firm grasp of financial markets, economics, and their interactions. He is a member of the CFA Institute, CFA Society of Los Angeles, Financial Planning Association of Los Angeles, NAPFA, and Toastmasters International. In addition to his work in finance, Ara also sits on the board of the World Children’s Transplant Fund where he also chairs the annual Global Partners’ Dinner. Ara is a frequent speaker at local medical schools, medical societies, professional organizations, and private businesses. He has a degree in finance from San Francisco State University, is a Commissioned Bank Examiner through the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation, Certified Financial Planner designation, and holds the Series 65 license. Ara currently lives in Los Angeles with his wife and two sons.

13 thoughts on “How Do Options Work?

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